Dec 16, 2010

Toyota's workplace safety philosophy is part of sustainability

As everyone knows, Toyota's been hard at work reducing vehicle safety risks, but it has also continued to emphasize safety improvement in its workplaces.

“Safe work is ‘the door’ to all work. Let us pass through this door,” Eiji Toyoda was quoted as saying in the 2010 Toyota Corporate Sustainability Report (CSR). The report stresses that Toyota’s fundamental belief is that safety is essential for sustaining and developing the company, and that placing safety first is everyone's responsibility, from senior executives to every employee at the workplace. To Toyota it is a universal value that is “unaffected by the times.” Furthermore, Toyota believes that no employee or team member should be put at risk of suffering a work-related accident.


Safety and Health Culture - Toyota Sustainability Report 2010


Beginning in FY2008, the approach has been “building a culture that enables all employees/team members to think for themselves and practice safety and health.” Each workplace is to be a driving force behind a company-wide effort.

The three pillars of this approach are: 


1. Improving the system for an “independent” or “interdependent” type safety culture where the workplace takes initiative for safety and health and promotes relevant activities, 


2. Promoting the Occupational Safety and Health Management System (OSHMS) continuously and thoroughly and 

3. Creating a structure for global implementation.

Through this workplace-driven approach, total accidents decreased by about 16% over the previous year, the number of lost workday cases decreased by 35%, and the number of STOP6-type accidents decreased by 14%.
 

STOP6 accidents:
  • Being caught in a machine,
  • Collision with a heavy object,
  • Collision with a vehicle,
  • Falls,
  • Electric shocks, and
  • Contact with a heated object
Its Occupational Safety and Health Management System (OSHMS) promotes safety and health activities. Emphasis on basic rule observance and interdependent bottom-up initiatives involving the whole company will be implemented in FY 2010. 
Toyota Occupational Safety and Health Management System (OSHMS)

The aim is that when all employees understand the benefits of an interdependent safety culture, they will make progress toward achieving and maintaining zero industrial accidents at each workplace.






Sources: Toyota Employee Relations
Corporate Sustainability Report (download PDF from this page)

1 comment:

Cristal Mcmeans said...

I think even the site itself undergoes a Poka-Yoke process as long as it's Toyota! I watched a presentation regarding Toyota's different manufacturing techniques and it blew me! Now that's what I call Japanese ingenuity!

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